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TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network 12376

VENUE HIRE DURBAN: We are not in the hospitality industry, but we do make our venue available to the public when not in use. Plenty of parking available, on TAXI route and not far from Durban CBD area, WIFI provided with a 4MB line, 2 white boards, flip-chart (markers provided, not flip chart paper but can be purchased at the venue) and standard tea/coffee included. Halaal bakery/deli within walking distance as well as a Mosque. Situated at the back of Avonmore SPAR with a range of freshly baked products, not to mention their range of hot meals. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network TRAINYOUCAN Accredited Training Network is a Private Higher Education Institution registered with the DHET (Department of Higher Education and Training) and accredited through the ETDP SETA with level 4 BEE status. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network ETDP, SETA, Accredited, Training provider, durban venue hire, trainer, assessor, moderator, sdf TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network Our Members Forum consist of over 17800 discussions, templates, model answers and incentive course discounts for every single course offered by our network. That’s right! We have free resources and discussions on every single course offered to members who attended a course with us with life-time access and support. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network In order to ensure that the overall quality of learning and assessment in South Africa is maintained at a consistently high level, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) requires that all corporate learning departments be accredited by the relevant ETQA. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network As part of our barest minimum standard and as can be attested by our previous and existing clients, are we fully compliant with all the requirements of the NQF act. We very clear in what we offer and do not get involved in any fraudulent or misleading advertising. TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network TRAINYOUCAN SETA Accredited Training Network

Type of Oral Delivery

Oftentimes at work, people generally use three forms of oral delivery: the scripted talk, the outlined talk, or the impromptu talk. Sometimes the situation or the profile of your listeners will dictate the types of talk you will give. At other times, you will be free to choose.

Scripted: A scripted speech is a word-for-word speech. Everything is written out that the presenter is planning to say. It can either be read or recited from memory. This offers security to the presenter if he/she is nervous or has a lot of specific or complex important information he/she needs to inform the audience about. It is also helpful for keeping within a time limit. Having a scripted talk ensures the presenter that each key point will be talked about, but be careful because this can make the speech rigid and is hard to deliver naturally.

Outlined: An outlined speech is just that, a speech that has been outlined to hit its main points. The outline helps the presenter remember to touch on a certain topic and offers more flexibility to “tune” the speech to the reactions from the audience. With this type of speech the presenter should be knowledgeable on the subject matter. Some may have trouble with phrasing an outlined speech or get tongue-tied. If critical information is not written down the presenter may forget to fully elaborate on key points that are vital to the success of the speech. This type of presentation is ideal when presenting information that is familiar to you.

Impromptu: An impromptu speech is given with little or no preparation. The presenter should be very knowledgeable on the subject matter. It is not uncommon for information delivered to the audience to be disorganized. Impromptu speeches are usually used in short informal meetings where the audience can interrupt and ask questions to help guide the speech and retrieve the information they need from the speaker. Although, depending on how interactive the audience is, without the help of proper questions, the speaker may miss the main point of the speech entirely.